Ellen

Ellen


Ellen was diagnosed with pilocytic astrocytoma (optic tumor) in 2005 at the age of 10 months. Her treatment included multiple surgeries, intensive chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. She suffers from multipole late effected as a result of her diagnosis and treatment, including diabetes, ACTH deficiency, growth hormone deficiency, kidney disease, neurocognitive dysfunction, and serious visual challenge. During elementary school, she demonstrated significant delays in reading comprehension, math, writing, and attention.
Read More/Less

Over the years, Making Headway has worked with the family to ensure a number of special resources are provided, including vision support, physical therapy, small group classes, counselling, and assistive technological tools. As Ellen moved into middle school, it became more evident that a specialized school would be required to meet her physical and educational needs. The family had to start considering Ellen’s long-term goals, including what life would look like after high school. Making Headway helped the family identify schools with hybrid programs that could offer academic learning with the latest technological tools (Ellen is legally blind) as well as life preparedness training so that she can achieve the highest level of independence as she enters adulthood.

Like many children who survive a brain tumor, their needs are constantly changing. The Making Headway On-Going Care Team understands the need to provide what is needed today, while developing a flexible and long-term plan. Children like Ellen would never have a chance to succeed, if not for the dedication and support of her family, her teachers, and everyone who supports the Making Headway Foundation.

Nancy

Nancy


Nancy has a condition called Neurofibromatosis 1, which often causes tumors on the optic nerve, and Nancy is no exception. Tumors grew in her eyes early on, and following treatment she was left with learning disabilities as well as an array of physical problems, from speech and visual impairment to scoliosis. To complicate matters, Nancy’s family has had to move three times, each time landing her in a new school district. It was a great relief to Nancy’s family when they were referred to Making Headway.
Read More/Less

Through Making Headway, Nancy was able to work with Education Specialist Patricia Weiner, who provided the girl and her family with support and guidance. Ms. Weiner helped Nancy’s teachers and school administrators in each school and district understand her unique needs, and advocated to ensure she received appropriate services every time. An important feature of these services is large print textbooks and other resources to support her visual impairment.

With this strong, knowledgeable support, Nancy made it successfully through elementary school. She recently entered high school, where she continues to get the support she needs, and is doing very well.

Eve

Ben


Around the time when I was five years old, headaches and migraines were a big part of my day. You could say they were like an additional sibling to my sister, Laura, that I got to hang out with—but not as much fun. After many, many visits to various doctors to figure out what in the world was going on, my parents made the great decision to visit a neurologist in New York City. Little did any of us know that trip would result in being admitted to the hospital, after learning the cause of headaches was a tumor that had decided to become friends with the cerebellum of my brain.
Read More/Less

My memories of being in the hospital are spotty, but I remember a few pieces. At the time I had fairly long hair and I remember the fear I had that I may need to get it shaved off for my upcoming operation to remove the tumor. Fortunately, that fear ended up being a non-issue. I was able to retain my hair, but the operation did result in me having a scar on the back of my head to be self-conscious about. I remember the tremendous staff at NYU, the great care I was given, and how they always tried to make me laugh (especially Adam the clown). Most important, I remember, and always will remember, meeting Maya and Edward Manley, who supported my family and me during this time and long after. And how could I forget the awesome Beanie Babies that were given to me after being purchased in the hospital gift shop?

After successful surgery (thank you Dr. Jeffrey Wisoff) and treatment (thank you Dr. Jeffrey Allen), I was released from the hospital. With the location of my tumor being the cerebellum, physical therapy was required to relearn some everyday skills—to name a few: balancing, walking, and picking up and holding an object.

Fast forward a handful of years to age 31: I have a full-time career in golf administration, where I get to follow my passion every day, and my wife Jenna and I are awaiting the arrival of our first child. Most people would never know what I went through when I was younger, but I’ll never forget it, and am fortunate for every day. I have so much to be thankful of and so many to be thankful for, but I’d be remiss if I didn’t say thank you to Maya, Edward and the Making Headway Foundation for all that you’ve done for me and everyone else in need. That scar that I was once self-conscious about is now something I’m proud of, as it shows where I was and how far I’ve come.

Standing Up (Michael’s Story)

Michael’s Story


My parents told me I swung my four-year-old feet to the side of the bed. I watched my legs dangle, while they held my IV tubes to follow me. Although I had been recuperating from emergency surgery (due to a complication during my radiation therapy), it was time to see if I could walk by myself. My parents said I had become weaker, trembling as they supported me, but I stood up.
Read More/Less

hope and help. Someone had once given me a little card with the poem “Footprints in the Sand.” I read it, probably like anyone reads it for the first time, and was surprised by the ending— because you do not see it coming when you read it for the first time. As a glioblastoma brain tumor survivor, I have many challenges. We all need to be carried sometimes, but on occasion, we have the ability to stand up and carry others.

Making Headway exists because it has understood this all along. When I trace my cancer journey, I see how Making Headway has been there to comfort, to educate, to encourage, and to celebrate everyone walking this particular journey. To make progress, you need to walk forward, but to make headway, you need others.

I have remained in remission since my treatment in 2005. However, I have suffered cognitive and physical deficits, including mild hemiparesis, from the trauma of this diagnosis. By surviving, my responsibility is to reveal my purpose, with gratitude. Now eighteen, I am so appreciative and excited to be attending college. I have much to accomplish, so I am using my inner strength and gratitude to ensure that I can land on my feet—because when I do stand up, my diligence delivers, my tenacity triumphs, and I rise to overcome my challenges. Grateful for how Making Headway has carried me through, I smile knowing that sometimes I can feel sand under my feet.

The support we need (Cairo’s Story)

The support we need (Cairo’s Story)


When my son Cairo was diagnosed with learning difficulties I was overwhelmed. Trying to navigate “the system” and receive help for my son left me confused and feeling helpless. I knew my son could receive services provided by the Department of Education, even though I chose to send him to a private school. But when services began I didn’t know if he was receiving all that he needed in order to have a successful educational experience. I had no one to speak to or ask questions of. I felt like I was imposing on my son’s school because they are not a school designed for special education.
Read More/Less

When I became connected with Making Headway’s Education Advocate Patty Weiner, I felt a weight lift off my shoulders. Patty has been an invaluable resource. She has a tremendous amount of experience and connections and has helped me not only with the DOE (obtaining testing for my son and understanding the results) but also with my son’s school. Whereas in the past I would sit back and hope that the services my son were receiving were “good enough,” I now know that I have someone looking out for my son’s best interests and who will make sure that he is receiving all the services he is entitled to. I can’t thank Making Headway enough for providing this valuable resource to our family. —Kelley Archer

Survivors Reunited (Julia & Christine’s Story)

Survivors Reunited (Julia & Christine’s Story)


When I was four and a half months old, I was diagnosed with a low-grade optic pathway glioma. My parents took me to NYU hospital were they met Dr. Epstein and Dr. Wisoff. They were confident that my tumor would be able to be treated through surgery and then chemotherapy. Eighteen and a half months later, with the grace of God and medicine I was able to overcome my brain tumor. Unfortunately, I did suffer vision loss in my right eye and am visually impaired in my left eye.
Read More/Less

Growing up in school was a challenge, to say the least, for me. The other children did not understand what it was like for me to have a disability. They would tease me about my vision and surgical scars to the point where I was bullied all the way through middle school. There were times that the teachers did not know what to do or how to help me to succeed in my work. At times, it felt impossible to get through school, but my family lifted me up, were always there for me, and told me to never give up. Years later, while I was at Caldwell University, my life had changed for the better. I began to pursue my degree in communications and vocal performance. It was at Caldwell that the most amazing thing happened…

Julia and Christine Together Again We were both in the same school where we had met one night in the music wing of the college. What we did not know was that we had met before, twenty-two years ago. One day, we just began talking and I mentioned to her that I was visually impaired from a brain tumor. At that point, Christine informed me that she had a brain tumor as a baby, as well. I asked her where she went for treatment, she said, “NYU.” I asked, “Do you know Dr. Allen?” She nodded her head and asked, “Maya?” We began to cry and called our parents. My mother was at work when I asked, “Hey Mom, do you know a Christine from when I was at NYU?” She responded, “Yes! You girls were roommates in chemotherapy…! She was having a bagel and you were having your bottle!” I said, “Oh my god! We both go to Caldwell U!” It just felt like something out of a movie! I mean, how often does a miracle happen in a lifetime? I survived a brain tumor that was almost impossible to overcome and I made a great friend who knows what this feels like. I really do believe that God puts you through things for a reason.

Susan

Susan


At age six, Susan was one of the brightest children in her class. Then she fell very ill. Tests revealed the presence of a large cell Anaplastic PNET—a malignant brain tumor. Suddenly, instead of experiencing the excitement of first grade, Susan was undergoing surgery to remove the tumor, then facing a long round of chemotherapy and radiation. While the treatment worked wonders on her cancer, the illness and its aftermath left their marks. Her hearing was compromised, the right side of her body was weakened (hemiparesis), and she was discovered to have developed a number of special learning needs.
Read More/Less

Susan’s neuropsychologist referred the child and her family to Making Headway, where they were introduced to Education Specialist Patricia Weiner, a member of our Ongoing Care Team. This was the start of a relationship that would last for many years. Ms. Weiner helped the anxious parents understand Susan’s changing needs, the services available to address these needs, and how best to obtain those services. She joined the family in working with teachers and special educators, as well as physical, occupational, language, hearing, and vision therapists.

From elementary through high school, Ms. Weiner continued to assist Susan’s family at dozens of meetings at school and with the Department of Education. She repeatedly observed in Susan’s classrooms to ensure that her needs were being met. Susan’s family remained very involved as well. Over the course of Susan’s schooling, over 200 educators played a role in helping her achieve success. Susan was still a bright and determined child, and with the help and support of all these adults she was able to compensate for many of her impairments.

Not long ago, Susan graduated high school with honors, and today she is attending community college. She’s doing quite well, but Making Headway Foundation will always be there for her if she needs us.

A lifeboat of the island (Owen’s Story)

A LIFEBOAT OFF THE ISLAND (Owen’s Story)


There are images you don’t forget when your child is diagnosed with a brain tumor. The look on your wife’s face as a doctor explains to her that, no, your son is not OK and won’t be going home from the hospital. The supernatural glow the tumor has when you look at that first image of his brain. The way a doctor idly twists a phone cord during a family meeting, sighs in a way that is so far from hopeful it doesn’t even feel in the same state as despair, and says, “So Second opinions…”
Read More/Less

Making Headway was a lifeboat off our lonely island of hopelessness. Our lives were changed irreversibly when Owen was diagnosed. But so, too, were they when NYU Neurosurgeon Dr. Jefrey Wisoff said he thought he could remove the tumor. And when the incredibly kind staff at Hassenfeld and Making Headway walked us through the resources at our disposal post-surgery. And when “Snowen” met Looney Lenny for the first time after surgery. And when we went to our first Family Fun Day on Father’s Day, 2009. And when we snapped a picture of Owen with Dr. Wisoff as he celebrated 10 years cancer-free.

We’re honored to be a part of the Making Headway community—a family of fighters, survivors, and angels. I’m not sure we would have made it off the island if not for them. “Thank you” seems inadequate to the task of expressing our gratitude.

Carolyn

Carolyn


Carolyn is a hard-working young woman who is currently a sophomore in high school. She is also a brain tumor survivor and lost her father when she was little. Many brain tumor survivors face difficult challenges as a result of surgeries, treatments, and missed time at school. Carolyn was experiencing difficulties after she finally returned to school, including problems with her schoolwork and anxiety about her social life. To help Carolyn, she was referred to Making Headway Education Specialist Sabina Bragg.
Read More/Less

Ms. Bragg worked with the family and realized that at the heart of Carolyn’s struggles there was a common theme: school instruction simply did not meet her unique needs. Ms. Bragg went to the school, conducted staff interviews, and observed Carolyn in several learning environments. Using this information, as well as a previous neuro-psychological evaluation, Ms. Bragg put together a comprehensive presentation for Carolyn’s instructional team at school. She worked with them to develop creative instructional approaches, such as the use of an iPhone to take audio notes instead of written notes, as note-taking was difficult for Carolyn. Ms. Bragg demonstrated how small group instructional tables would provide the special education support that would not only support Carolyn, but also the entire class. Ms. Bragg helped change the mindset in the school, enabling staff to understand that Carolyn’s problems were due to behavioral issues caused by her treatment, and were typical of a child with her complex medical background.

Carolyn continues to show how strong she is despite all that she has been through. Her mother is extremely happy with the progress that she has made and is grateful for Ms. Bragg’s assistance, passion, and expertise.

Arnold

Arnold


Arnold was only five years old when he was diagnosed with a brain tumor. He received six weeks of radiation and eleven weeks of chemotherapy. The chemotherapy was cut short due to a variety of serious side effects include hearing loss and the onset of learning disabilities. When he returned to school, his teachers reported “things he knew before the surgery, he forgot after the surgery”. He also needed to re-learn basic motor skills. Over the years, Making Headway has worked with the family and the school to ensure that Arnold received the best possible education and the services that he needed to achieve his goal of graduating high school.
Read More/Less

Arnold is currently enrolled in a co-teaching integrated classroom in 8th grade. This class has both a general education and special education professional assigned to work with both classified and non-classified students. Arnold will have the same program next year when he transitions to high school. In addition to the integrated class, Arnold receives a series of special services, including: speech, language, and physical therapy; a 1:1 paraprofessional; and special testing accommodations (extended time, questions read to him, etc.).

Over the past year, Arnold has made tremendous progress. With the specialized resources he now receives, his results on both the math and reading state tests improved by over 50%. He is now achieving at grade level and on a Regents Diploma High School track. Every day is still a struggle, but Making Headway and Arnold are working hard to overcome any challenges and achieve his goals.