You’ve Come a long way baby (Jake’s Story)

You’ve Come a long way baby (Jake’s Story)


YOU’VE COME A LONG WAY, BABY. The slogan—from a cigarette ad in the 70s—is now, thank goodness, very much outdated. But it can be used in a different context. Our son, Jake, has come a long way from when he was a 3-month-old baby in 1990 with a rare malignant brain tumor, to where he is today as a 30-year-old man. Yes, he has never spoken, and he is significantly developmentally delayed, but he has overcome many obstacles that most take for granted. Plus, he is the happiest person we have ever met.
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We will never forget meeting the late Dr. Fred Epstein, Jake’s surgeon. Leaning back in his chair with his cowboy boots on his desk, Fred confidently told us that he would likely be able to remove Jake’s tumor. Meeting Dr. Jeffrey Allen was also unforgettable. He laid out the facts. Jeff, despite all his experience, had only treated three kids with Jake’s tumor: one had passed, one was ok, and the other was somewhere in between. (Making Headway originated when Dr. Epstein, along with Dr. Allen, began the Institute for Neurology and Neurosurgery.) Jake was often a patient at NYU Hospital. The halls and rooms then were dingy. But that was where we met Maya Manley. She warmly greeted us and then suggested that we attend a meeting. That was the beginning of our partnership with Maya and Ed.

Over the past 30 years, advances have been made in the treatment of pediatric brain and spinal cords tumors—but baby, we still have a long way to go. Today, there are more than 28,000 children living with a brain or spinal cord tumor. Over 2,500 children are diagnosed every year (seven every day), and they are currently the leading cause of death among all childhood cancers! Pediatric brain and spinal cord tumor achievements have not kept pace with other areas of oncology, where great strides have been made.

Every day when we are with Jake, we are reminded how lucky we are! We want many more children and their families to feel as lucky (and even luckier). While Jake was never able to go to college, how great is it that among the myriad things that Making Headway funds, we grant college scholarships for brain tumor survivors. Who knows, maybe one of them will become a leading scientist or philanthropist in this fight. In the meantime, help us now, by contributing to Making Headway. It would be the best possible 30th birthday present for Jake (and us).

Molly

Molly


Molly was a bright young elementary school student who excelled academically and was well-liked by her teachers and other students. One day she began feeling very sick and her family rushed her to the doctor. Molly had a brain tumor and required complex neurosurgery.
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Molly was lucky that the doctors were able to successfully remove her tumor, and she made further progress with the help of chemotherapy and radiation. However, Molly was left with permanent side-effects that impacted her speech, hearing, and cognitive abilities. Her school was not equipped with appropriate programs or services to provide for what she needed. Her family realized they would have to find her another school, and they were referred to Making Headway Education Specialist Patricia Weiner, who has been helping Molly ever since.

Finding the right school in a huge city can be daunting in any situation, let alone one in which there are so many special education considerations. As Molly recuperated, she was provided with home instruction. In the meantime, after spending some time learning about Molly’s issues and the family’s preferences, Ms. Weiner began researching schools and programs, eventually finding one that suited everyone’s needs. Then, she worked with the school, attending meetings and advocating for Molly, to ensure the appropriate services were in place.

As Molly grew, Ms. Weiner continued to ensure she received all the complex services, accommodations and equipment she needed. In Molly’s case, this included a one-on-one health paraprofessional; hearing and vision education services; physical, occupational, speech and language therapy; assistive physical education; a special type of hearing aid; large print books, and special homework preparation. Ms. Weiner even identified a service coordinator who could help Molly obtain a half-fare Metrocard and door-to-door school transportation.

The result? Not only did Molly graduate from High School, but she was the proud recipient of a New York State Regents Diploma, a major accomplishment for any child with special health care needs. She is now attending a special post-high school transition program, and Making Headway has arranged for another expert consultant to help her explore college options and find one that is just right for her.

Carolyn

Carolyn


Carolyn is a hard-working young woman who is currently a sophomore in high school. She is also a brain tumor survivor and lost her father when she was little. Many brain tumor survivors face difficult challenges as a result of surgeries, treatments, and missed time at school. Carolyn was experiencing difficulties after she finally returned to school, including problems with her schoolwork and anxiety about her social life. To help Carolyn, she was referred to Making Headway Education Specialist Sabina Bragg.
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Ms. Bragg worked with the family and realized that at the heart of Carolyn’s struggles there was a common theme: school instruction simply did not meet her unique needs. Ms. Bragg went to the school, conducted staff interviews, and observed Carolyn in several learning environments. Using this information, as well as a previous neuro-psychological evaluation, Ms. Bragg put together a comprehensive presentation for Carolyn’s instructional team at school. She worked with them to develop creative instructional approaches, such as the use of an iPhone to take audio notes instead of written notes, as note-taking was difficult for Carolyn. Ms. Bragg demonstrated how small group instructional tables would provide the special education support that would not only support Carolyn, but also the entire class. Ms. Bragg helped change the mindset in the school, enabling staff to understand that Carolyn’s problems were due to behavioral issues caused by her treatment, and were typical of a child with her complex medical background.

Carolyn continues to show how strong she is despite all that she has been through. Her mother is extremely happy with the progress that she has made and is grateful for Ms. Bragg’s assistance, passion, and expertise.

The support we need (Cairo’s Story)

The support we need (Cairo’s Story)


When my son Cairo was diagnosed with learning difficulties I was overwhelmed. Trying to navigate “the system” and receive help for my son left me confused and feeling helpless. I knew my son could receive services provided by the Department of Education, even though I chose to send him to a private school. But when services began I didn’t know if he was receiving all that he needed in order to have a successful educational experience. I had no one to speak to or ask questions of. I felt like I was imposing on my son’s school because they are not a school designed for special education.
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When I became connected with Making Headway’s Education Advocate Patty Weiner, I felt a weight lift off my shoulders. Patty has been an invaluable resource. She has a tremendous amount of experience and connections and has helped me not only with the DOE (obtaining testing for my son and understanding the results) but also with my son’s school. Whereas in the past I would sit back and hope that the services my son were receiving were “good enough,” I now know that I have someone looking out for my son’s best interests and who will make sure that he is receiving all the services he is entitled to. I can’t thank Making Headway enough for providing this valuable resource to our family. —Kelley Archer

Mary’s Story

Mary’s Story


Mary was an 8-year-old girl, newly diagnosed with a pineoblastoma and associated hydrocephalus who had just undergone a surgical resection to remove the tumor from the pineal gland of her brain. Most children who undergo this type of surgery encounter a variety of side effects, including ones that affect both motor and mental functions. Neuropsychologist Dr. Kate McGee (whose position is funded by Making Headway) was asked to consult with the family due to concerns regarding her language, processing, and communication following her surgery.
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Through an assessment battery which was individually-tailored to account for Mary’s hearing loss, Dr. McGee was able to discern that she was, in fact, cognitively intact and did not have cognitive or expressive language deficits, despite initial concerns to the contrary. In fact, Mary was very bright, with important areas of neurocognitive strength that were being masked by her newly acquired hearing deficits. Furthermore, in attempting to compensate for her hearing loss, Mary was relying entirely on alternative strategies for communication. Dr. McGee’s consultation helped to inform Mary’s physical, occupational, and speech and language therapies, highlighting that in order to communicate effectively, Mary required direct eye contact to enhance her ability for lip reading. Thereafter, Mary was far better able to communicate interpersonally and express her needs with both her treatment team and her parents.

Fortunately, as her medical situation stabilized, discussion was able to shift to her return to school and associated educational needs in the context of her medical history and hearing impairment. Educational Coordinator at Hassenfeld, Julia Gomez, met with Mary’s family and communicated with her school to ensure appropriate support and accommodations were put in place in anticipation of her return to the classroom. With the support of Making Headway and the NYU Hassenfeld Center, Mary’s future looks bright.

Henry

Henry


Henry’s brain tumor was discovered just before his fourth birthday and it required intensive treatment. Unfortunately, the very treatment that saved his life also left Henry with a host of challenges, including memory deficits, difficulties with executive functioning, language and motor skills problems, and more. When he reached second grade, Henry was introduced to Making Headway, where he and his family met Education Specialist Dr. Susan Leslie.
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Once Dr. Leslie had helped the family understand the various services that could make a significant difference for their son, they concluded that their local school district would not be able to provide what he needed. With Dr. Leslie’s help, they explored neighboring districts, and the family moved in time for Henry to begin third grade at a new school. At that point, Dr. Leslie became an integral part of Henry’s school team, helping them develop strategies and accommodations that would foster his school success.

Henry is currently in ninth grade and doing remarkably well. With the help of continued language and academic support services, he is working at grade level. On track for an academic diploma, Henry has every intention of attending college. In the meantime, Dr. Leslie continues to be there for him, meeting with his family and the school team regularly to review and adjust his educational plan.

Nancy

Nancy


Nancy has a condition called Neurofibromatosis 1, which often causes tumors on the optic nerve, and Nancy is no exception. Tumors grew in her eyes early on, and following treatment she was left with learning disabilities as well as an array of physical problems, from speech and visual impairment to scoliosis. To complicate matters, Nancy’s family has had to move three times, each time landing her in a new school district. It was a great relief to Nancy’s family when they were referred to Making Headway.
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Through Making Headway, Nancy was able to work with Education Specialist Patricia Weiner, who provided the girl and her family with support and guidance. Ms. Weiner helped Nancy’s teachers and school administrators in each school and district understand her unique needs, and advocated to ensure she received appropriate services every time. An important feature of these services is large print textbooks and other resources to support her visual impairment.

With this strong, knowledgeable support, Nancy made it successfully through elementary school. She recently entered high school, where she continues to get the support she needs, and is doing very well.

Chloe

Chloë


It’s been nearly 16 years since Roselle Tunison first found herself in an ambulance with her 6-month-old daughter, Chloë. Chloë had experienced a brain hemorrhage, and she’d shortly be diagnosed with a brain tumor. It was the beginning of a grueling journey, with myriad ups and downs, that continues to this day. But fortunately, it was also the beginning of Roselle and her family’s relationship with Making Headway.
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When her kids were young, Roselle would need to bring not only Chloë but her twin brother, Johnny, on the lengthy trips from their Long Island home to the hospital in Manhattan. (First, Beth Israel and, later, NYU Langone Medical Center.)

“The playroom is what made it doable,” she says. “It was so welcoming and warm. I could connect with other mothers going through the same thing there. For the kids, waiting for the doctor was arts and crafts time.”

Making Headway supports families for as long as necessary, whether that means an afternoon or a lifetime. Roselle has many stories to tell about her warm interactions with Drs. Allen and Kothbauer (members of Making Headway’s medical advisory board) and the Making Headway team. There was the time she and Johnny were waiting for Chloë to awaken after yet another surgery. It had been a long, stressful day and they were both tired and hungry, but she didn’t want to leave the waiting room. Suddenly, Maya appeared, bearing cupcakes!

There were the many times “the yoga fairy,” Annie Hickman, was on hand to help the children spend their waiting time with fanciful activities. There was support from psychiatrist Dr. Hess and psychologists Dr. Greenleaf and Dr. Donnelly. And there was assistance from education specialists Patty Weiner and Sabina Bragg. Roselle remembers warmly the period when Bragg (a member of Making Headway’s Ongoing Care Team at the time) helped the teachers and administrators at Chloë’s middle school understand the child’s special challenges: “Most schools don’t know anything about kids with brain tumors. They don’t realize that certain behavior problems are typical, and they blame the parents or something else. Sabina joined in our phone calls and made sure I was being heard,” Roselle explains.

Chloë still has her struggles at school and at home. The road hasn’t been easy for the Tunisons. But Roselle credits Making Headway for making everything a whole lot better than it might have been.

“What really stands out about Making Headway is the warm, compassionate care. There are days when you feel like you’re just going to give up because nobody understands what you’re going through. Making Headway understands.”

Arnold

Arnold


Arnold was only five years old when he was diagnosed with a brain tumor. He received six weeks of radiation and eleven weeks of chemotherapy. The chemotherapy was cut short due to a variety of serious side effects include hearing loss and the onset of learning disabilities. When he returned to school, his teachers reported “things he knew before the surgery, he forgot after the surgery”. He also needed to re-learn basic motor skills. Over the years, Making Headway has worked with the family and the school to ensure that Arnold received the best possible education and the services that he needed to achieve his goal of graduating high school.
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Arnold is currently enrolled in a co-teaching integrated classroom in 8th grade. This class has both a general education and special education professional assigned to work with both classified and non-classified students. Arnold will have the same program next year when he transitions to high school. In addition to the integrated class, Arnold receives a series of special services, including: speech, language, and physical therapy; a 1:1 paraprofessional; and special testing accommodations (extended time, questions read to him, etc.).

Over the past year, Arnold has made tremendous progress. With the specialized resources he now receives, his results on both the math and reading state tests improved by over 50%. He is now achieving at grade level and on a Regents Diploma High School track. Every day is still a struggle, but Making Headway and Arnold are working hard to overcome any challenges and achieve his goals.

A lifeboat of the island (Owen’s Story)

A LIFEBOAT OFF THE ISLAND (Owen’s Story)


There are images you don’t forget when your child is diagnosed with a brain tumor. The look on your wife’s face as a doctor explains to her that, no, your son is not OK and won’t be going home from the hospital. The supernatural glow the tumor has when you look at that first image of his brain. The way a doctor idly twists a phone cord during a family meeting, sighs in a way that is so far from hopeful it doesn’t even feel in the same state as despair, and says, “So Second opinions…”
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Making Headway was a lifeboat off our lonely island of hopelessness. Our lives were changed irreversibly when Owen was diagnosed. But so, too, were they when NYU Neurosurgeon Dr. Jefrey Wisoff said he thought he could remove the tumor. And when the incredibly kind staff at Hassenfeld and Making Headway walked us through the resources at our disposal post-surgery. And when “Snowen” met Looney Lenny for the first time after surgery. And when we went to our first Family Fun Day on Father’s Day, 2009. And when we snapped a picture of Owen with Dr. Wisoff as he celebrated 10 years cancer-free.

We’re honored to be a part of the Making Headway community—a family of fighters, survivors, and angels. I’m not sure we would have made it off the island if not for them. “Thank you” seems inadequate to the task of expressing our gratitude.